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INDIGO

“I AM A FEMALE ARTIST FROM SERBIA, THE NAME BASICALLY WAS A MEANINGFUL COINCIDENCE, IT KEPT POPPING UP THROUGHOUT MY LIFE IN THE MOST PECULIAR OF PLACES”

YOUR WORK IS A MIX OF LUCID DREAMS AND RAINBOWS YOU HAVE OUR OWN PARALLEL WORLD, HOW DID YOU VISUALIZE THAT COMBINATION OF IDEAS IN YOUR MIND?

It is simply a way I ‘see’ things and feel that it’s the way they should look so I’m trying to get that vision across to others.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE ART FORM YOU LIKE TO PRESENT YOUR WORK?

I prefer digital art but hope to get into music someday as well, have been obsessed with music my whole life.

WHAT TRIGGERS YOUR IMAGINATION?

Just anything I see in my day to day life but most often it’s nature and music respectively.

IF YOU COULD MEET UP WITH ONE OF YOU’RE FAVORITE ICONS, WHO WOULD IT BE AND WHY?

I would love to have been able to meet George Michael, besides being a superbly talented singer he also seemed like a one of a kind human being with a heart of gold.

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DENIS SHECKLER

I love to create collages or funky images in Photoshop. I started to explore photoshop back in 2012. I always search for inspiration by looking through thousands and thousands of photos and pictures.

HOW DO YOU GIVE THAT KINDA A DESATURATED VINTAGE LOOK TO YOUR WORK? 

Once I tried to develop a unique style for my Instagram feed and decided that the film style with grain and low saturation would be the best! I do this in Adobe Lightroom. 

HOW WAS YOUR EXHIBITION AT GALLERIE SAKURA PARIS?

This is a big experience for me, it is my first exhibition. It has only started from June 1st and I hope it will be a success.

WHAT IS THE BEST PHASE OF YOUR LIFE AND WHAT IS THE WORST?

The best phase of my life is studying at university: so many friends and parties, this is the school of life. The worst phase of my life are the days when you dont get an inspiration to do your lovely collages. Sometimes it can be a long process time when I sit and think about concept etc, it can take from 6 hours to 2-3 days.

DOES YOUR WORK REPRESENT A REFLECTION OF YOUR IDENTITY? AND WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO THINK OF YOUR WORK?

So in each collage I try to add some objects which will get some resonance with social problems, but sometimes I make just those things that I love “just beauty of 3d objects, shapes, etc”. It often reflects my emotions at that time when I create new collage, when I listen to my favorite music and so on.

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REKODE

“Since childhood, I have always been fascinated with large, residential buildings. Not because of the architecture, but because they have personality, defined by what’s inside. So many stories. Some tragic. I find them both beautiful and frightening”

GROWING UP DID YOU KNEW WHAT YOU WANTED TO BECOME?

No, and I still don’t. I don’t do very well with blank canvases, which is what those decisions are like as a kid.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MOVIE AND HAVE YOU EVER CRIED WHILE WATCHING A MOVIE? IF YES WHAT IS THE NAME OF IT?

The Matrix Trilogy, as one long movie, is my favorite, but it’s closely followed by many others. I love movies so much, and I tend to get carried away by stories and music, so I cry in most movies.

WHAT’S YOU PHILOSOPHY IN LIFE? AND DO YOU THINK WE MUST FAIL TO SUCCEED?

Existential dread, but without the actual dread. I look at the vastness of space and time in comparison to my own existence and am quite content with being completely insignificant. Yes and no. I think we must repeat the process to succeed. Failure is part of the repetition process.

YOUR STYLE IS QUITE UNIQUE HOW DID YOU DEVELOP THIS STYLE?

It wasn’t conscious. Over time, I have just gotten better at converting ideas to something visually interesting, and this is really just how my imagination looks.

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Alvaro Castro

Rebirth of romanticism

Rebirth of romanticism

Alvaro Castro

Based in Almeria in the south of Spain, Alvaro Castro has transformed his work into unforgettable illustrations that reveal various facets of our daily lives. “I do conceptual illustrations of a wide range of subjects, but most notably love, interpersonal relationships, and social networks,” he says.

HOW DID YOU START YOUR CAREER AS AN ARTIST?

I started participating in small contests online about 13 years ago and winning a contest. Then I finished studying at the Art School and from that moment I wanted to be a graphic designer for the rest of my life, it has always been my passion.

HOW DO YOU GET THE CONCEPT OF YOUR WORK OF ART?

I try to express a complex idea in a few very concise words and with these words I try to look for very direct elements that are capable of expressing them as best as possible.

HOW DO YOU INTRODUCE YOURSELF?

My name is Alvaro Castro, I’m a graphic designerillustrator born and raised in Andalucia, southern Spain, the son of parents, teachers and brother of two sisters, and a brother. I consider myself a cheerful person, very joking and who is always thinking about new things to do.

WHO ARE YOUR IDOLS?

I have an icon outside the world of illustration in which I fix at the time of synthesizing the elements to express an idea with the least number of these is Chema Madoz, a great photographer who does fantastic works.

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Beyonce X Jay-Z

Beyonce X Jay-Z | Takes over the Louvre

The couple caused a heated controversy by using the Louvre as a location for their recently released music video and collaborative album, the Carters show just how much their dynamic as a couple has evolved. There new album The most widely shared photograph showed Jay-Z and Beyoncé flanking the “Mona Lisa,” approximating her dodgy expression.

The Atlantic ~ So how did one of the most visible couples in the music world—who have already toured together and put out decades of videos about their love, sex, and mutual success—create something that feels even the slightest bit fresh? The spectacle of making new art using some of the most famous Western art in the world certainly helped. But though the duo had grappled with their evolving conceptions of gender in their own projects, “Apeshit” and Everything Is Love represent the Carters’ first real attempt to stitch those ideas together into a cohesive whole. Until this point, most of their collaborations had credited them by their respective names: as “Jay-Z feat. Beyoncé” or vice versa. But their new joint alias, “the Carters,” signals a blending of their artistry.

Throughout their nearly 15-year relationship, Beyoncé, 36, and JAY-Z, 48 have always made powerful collaborations that changed the music industry all around the world. Lately the release of there latest album was a complete wrap of combining the old history of the louvre with modern pop.
The R&B stars’ hit song “Apeshit” which used some of the museum’s greatest masterpieces as backdrops  has been viewed 88 million times on YouTube alone since it was released on june the 16th. Now the Louvre, which already has a tour based on the US rapper will.i.am’s hit “Smile Mona Lisa”, has created another based on the Carters’ night in the museum.
The video  showed a stunning 17 paintings and sculptures which feature in a six-minute video clip, going from the monumental white Greek marble “Nike of Samothrace” to Marie Benoist’s .
The choice of works which they used or posed in front of has been taken as a celebration of black bodies and empowerment in an institution which was built on the spoils of conquest and imperialism.
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Iris Van Herpen

Iris van Herpen the 34 years old Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s 
most talented and forward-thinking designers that always push to break  the boundaries of fashion design. Since her first show in 2007 van Herpen has been preoccupied with inventing new forms and methods of sartorial expression of fashion by combining the most traditional and the most radical materials  constructing master pieces by her unique methods to take us into her unique aesthetic vision. She calls this design ethos “New Couture.”
~Van Herpen about describing her work

If I were to use one word to describe my work, it would be movement 
as one of the most influential things in my life has been my classical ballet practice. Through dance I learned about the seduction of movement, the transformation of the body and the ‘evolution’ of shape. Those years taught me how to shift shape and were the birth of my interest in fashion.

I Don’t think of fashion as being clothes, or a discipline. I think of it being much more. I see fashion as a dialogue between our inside and our outside.
For me fashion is a form of art that is close related to me and my body. I see it as a very personal expression of identity combined with desire, mood and culture.

Looking around me, I consider what I can’t see as much as what I can see, and that transformative focus creates freedom in my work. Each garment and every collection is an embodiment to new understanding and discovery, on conceptual level, on the level of materiality and on the level of femininity. Its my search to new forms of femininity through organic silhouettes, delicate craftsmanship, innovation and the collaboration with other artists, architects and scientists.

There’s beauty in contrast, new terrains are found at the intersection between precision and chaos, art and science, the human touch and the high-tech, the artificial and the organic.”

Collections
with over 15 collections van herpen has always made it clear about her extraordinary talent introducing her collection in Paris fashion week 2017 AERIFORM 
 
AERIFORM – ‘Aeriform’ examines the nature and anatomy of air and the idea of airborne materiality and lightness, creating negative and positive space with shadow and light.

Van Herpen also drew inspiration from the Danish underwater artists Between Music who challenge the relationship between the body and its elemental surround, in a subaquatic environment where air is absent.

“Their liquid voices and the subsonic darkness from Between Music overwhelmed me. It motivated me to dive into the contrasts between water and air, between inside and outside, between darkness and lightness.”
Iris van Herpen

Between Music have collaborated with deep sea divers, physicists and neuroscientists over many years to develop a hypnotic biophonic sound sculpture which they perform on custom-built instruments while submerged in water. Their work transcends and transforms the conventional and natural relationship between our bodies and the elements.

“I’m doubly fascinated: I feel so free in the water – and at the same time I feel a slight hint of terror. Water is a fantastically exciting element because of its dual nature.”
Leila Skovmand, Between Music

Air and water are the structural and visual components of the eighteen elaborate silhouettes of the collection and have influenced the development of both the textiles and garment construction, which is reflected in their volumes, rippling patterning and translucent layering.

Biomorphic structures include a feathery-light metal lace of geodesic floral patterns in collaboration with Philip Beesley, which float around the body like a silver cloud. Echo waves of mylar bonded cotton ripple across the skin mapping the surface of the body and painting its contours.

The shoes are made from a soft suede with a parametric welded metal heel, creating a delicate molecular lattice around the foot.

LUCID – For her Lucid collection the Dutch designer Iris van Herpen explores the concept of lucid dreaming. Within a lucid dream, the dreamer is conscious of the dream state and therefore is able to exert a degree of control on what is happening.
“When I design, the draping process most of the time happens to me unconsciously. I see lucid dreams as a microscope with which I can look into my unconsciousness. In this collection, I have tried to bring my state of ‘reality’ and my state of dreaming, together,” notes the designer.
Both the models and the audience are mirrored as one in the show space, creating a close-up and intimate experience that is amplified by seventeen large optical light screens (OLF). Depending on the viewing angle, movement and proximity to the sheets, the perception of the audience that view the models is continuously shifted and deluded to reflect the fine line between reality and unreality
. The visual alienation of the OLF was influential to van Herpen her design process. There are 2 main design techniques presented in the collection: the lucid looks and the phantom dresses. The lucid looks result from the designer’s continuous collaboration with the artist and architect Philip Beesley. These looks are made from transparent hexagonal laser-cut elements that are connected with translucent flexible tubes, creating a glistering bubble-like exoskeleton around the wearer’s body.
The phantom looks are made with a super light tulle to which iridescent stripes are fused, shimmering the silhouette illusory. Continuing van Herpen’s vigor of fusing technology with handcraft, the collection features two 3D printed Magma dresses that are combining flexible TPU printing, creating a fine web together with polyamide printing. One of the dresses is stitched from 5,000 3D printed elements. This season van Herpen opted for organic, circular, and voluminous silhouettes in light, iridescent colors of nude, green, and gray.
The Aero shoes in collaboration with Finsk, are made from wood, laser-cut leather and an ultra-thin transparent acrylic heel that separate the sole and the upper, creating a hovering look.

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MARIA UVE

Maria uve, The Artist that broke the internet with her illustrations focusing mainly on relationships and love.

“Im from Spain and I am 32 years old , I study illustration and photography nowadays to widen the horizons of artworks trying to improve them as much as I can” .
How did you start your career?
 
My art career started at this moment of my life through instagram as I didn’t have an art career before earlier in my life.
Is there a specific person you consider as an icon for you?
 
My icon is everyone who has a dream or a goal and meets it but my favorite artist is Salvador Dali.

What do you expect to reach as an artist in two years ?
In two years I want to work in a editorial projects mostly.
Who’s the person who motivated you the most ?
the person who motivates me the most is my cousin, he always supports me and who motivates me the most what she does is xaviera lopez I love the things she does, I also like paula bonet and brokenisntbad.
Sex or Chocolate ?
 
between sex or chocolate I choose sex
Your favorite fashion trend ?
 
the best fashion trend for me is all of the clothes just love them.
Worst fashion trend ?
 
Bell-bottoms
Who’s your favorite singer ?
 
I have alot but maybe  Queen is my favorite.
What about food ?
 
I love the food , my favorite food is a Spanish food it is called  paella .
How do you introduce yourself ?
 
I can say of myself, I’m so creative and I respect and love the animals.
Thing you most love ?
 
the beach of course.
Thing you fear most ?
 
Maybe can’t do the things that I love and thing that scares me the most is not being able to enjoy everything I like.
Why you can’t go to the  beach ?
 
My work to be able to dedicate myself and  to art so I don’t have much time .
If you have one dream that could be fulfilled what would it be ?
 
I make a dream come true, that there would not be wars?! but a proper dream is to go around the world.
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The Controversy Of Art

 

 
 

All our lives, we have been surrounded by art in many forms; paintings, music, dancing, writing, pottery and so many more. You may use art as a self-expression tool, or to heal or simply as a means of relaxation. For most artists, they use their craft as a source of income, as a lifeline, they are bonded to their art. However, due to recent controversial tweets and comments on social media, some people have made it their mission to justify separating the art from the artist.

I have very contradicting views on this. Sometimes as I writer and illustrator I find myself wondering, do I see parts of myself in what I am producing? Or am I simply producing work that isn’t necessarily up to par with my standards but I know will satisfy my readers? One of the most painful feelings has to be living for the pleasure of other people, often art is a means by which you may easily change that dynamic. If we think of it this way, there are two ends to this, the artist and the receiver. You are the person producing the art for people to view it, you can simultaneously be the receiver and the artist. This comes without saying; the source of art is within yourself, you are using your own hands to write, your own mind to create, how could you possibly want to separate an extension of yourself? Once the art is made, it will forever be bonded to you in one form or another because it originated from your mind, YOU are your art, it’s a beautiful thing. Some people profit off this idea, what makes my art stand out, for example, is the fact I use my vulnerability for my art, it is an extension of me, without it I believe, my art would lack authenticity.

I feel as though separating the art from the artist is an idle and simple way of viewing things. However, we can empathize in certain cases. Have you ever liked a song so much but felt a certain level of uneasiness listening to it because you loathed the artist? It feels odd thinking about it, sometimes you have to realize that regardless of how a person has maligned you, talent and persona aren’t mutually exclusive. You don’t have to like a person to be mature enough to take a step back and realize they have a gift and have found their calling. It is no secret that some artists are unpleasant people. In life, not everything is black or white. Life is shall I say made up of 50 shades of grey… Humans will pick and choose who they want to support and be reluctant to support others based on their views. I think there is almost a hierarchy in which we classify artists who can be separated by their art and those who are shunned by society; people also tend to weigh the worthiness of an artist based on the severity of their transgressions.

There have been many protests and petitions made against museums for displaying the work of artists who are alleged sexual abusers, visitors often find themselves questioning whether or not museums should be responsible for withholding certain values and ethics. These institutions have been deemed insensitive for keeping the paintings, this comes back to the same debate around the separation of the art from the artist. Should these exhibitions be censored? Should there be a disclaimer on the art being exhibited? The latter wouldn’t even have an effect due to the slow peril of autobiographies, in museums, millennials just don’t want to read them. Should we really be celebrating the legacy of an artist despite their transgressions? They say ignorance is bliss, some may be able to admire the work of these artists but others are unable to see the paintings in the same light with the knowledge that they have a sinister meaning behind them.

Most artists know they don’t lack in talent, even if they do; our overinflated egos would never allow us to show our insecurities. As a consequence, they don’t mind being associated with their art because they want people to know it came from them.Some artists simply don’t want to be associated with their art because they don’t want the fame, or don’t need it, they simply want to coexist side by side their art, they prefer the anonymity and think it allows people to admire their art more objectively. It almost feels as though there is a ‘drain in art’ because of this deliberate disassociation.

To conclude, I don’t know much, but I do know this; I am my art, my art is an extension of my being, no matter the distance or the person I become, I never want to be separated from it. I am not perfect, I am a hypocrite, I may not follow the advice I give, but what’s the point of making art if it’s not going to be a raw part of yourself? In other words, take us as we are, or watch us as we go. In art, like everything else in the world, there are extremists, it leads us to wonder if where we can find a middle ground, but then again, what criteria are we basing ourselves upon, there is no rule book to life.

Article by @Queenofthickthighs on Instagram (Damilola Toriola

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IF Nothing Else I Have This

“If nothing else I have this” is what I constantly tell myself when I feel like giving up writing. There are so many things I wish I could have told my younger self before I entered the creative field. There are so many factors that would make you want to leave the creative field all together. When you’re an outsider you wouldn’t always understand why we complain about certain things, or more of you wouldn’t be able to relate to what they are going through. But you know what they always say, don’t judge situations you have not lived through because it could become yours in a nanosecond. 

You will receive a lot of rejections, sometimes it feels like when you finally take 1 step forward the world pushes you 20 steps back. You have to build a thick skin and know the value of your craft because so many things in life will push you towards doubting something you were once so sure about. You have to get used to being knocked down, magazines telling you they can’t publish the work you’ve been writing for months. There’s also a sense of rejection from social media, it’s very easy to feel alone when you post your work and there is a lack of interactions.

Don’t allow this to translate into a lack of talent. One of the worst forms of rejections is when people try to manipulate you into giving them your craft in exchange for exposure rather than money. It’s almost insulting, don’t you think my work is good enough for me to make a profit off it? I believe working for exposure is only worthwhile if that exposure will reach a larger audience than the one you have. Always know your worth as a creative.

People will dehumanize you to the point they assume you are robotic simply because you are talented at something. The will romanticize your pain in any way they can, you could be writing about the most intimate and frightening moments of your life and readers would still find a way to link it to beauty. It’s so painful when people want to be involved with you simply to boost their egos when they think they could serve as inspiration for your next project. When you give advice as a writer, people will always come and ask for help, which is completely normal, however next to none of them would even think to ask you: “how are you?” or “are you in the right mental state to be able to help me?”.

Its lovely being a safe space for strangers all over the world, but it’s awful being emotionally drained to the point you can no longer help yourself. These unrealistic expectations put so much pressure on writers to constantly uphold that facade of perfection when in reality, you’re hurting as much as everyone else. I wish I had known it was okay to take a break, because most people don’t care about your mental health, it is okay to deactivate your account or your blog for a while until you’re in a better space mentally, at the end of the day you have to out yourself first or else the quality of your craft will never be up to par.

 

People get so upset and resentful when they find out you don’t stick to one creative field and want to explore other options, especially people closest to you. There is no creative rulebook, you can be a dancer as well as an artist, you can be a singer as well as a writer, don’t ever limit yourself to one field, talents aren’t mutually exclusive to each other. When you pick up a new interest, people will mask their jealousy with snarky comments like “when were you ever interested in singing?”, stay far away from people who doubt you, this will also serve as motivation to want to prove these people wrong. Some people will never accept that you’re growing and leaving them in the same place you both started. If you see someone picking up a new interest, always encourage them and push them to better themselves.

A lot people will never support you, it’s almost shocking the extreme lengths to which certainn people go in order to post and support celebrities rather than their own friends. I always used to support other creatives whatever the path it is they chose to follow, but in 2017 when I entered the creative field, I could count on one hand the number of people who supported me without me having to nag them to post my craft.

 

Most of all what I wish I knew was that writing will free you from all boundaries the world has set for you. I think when you start as a creative it’s always more of a hobby you do in your free time then it becomes an Elysian feeling to excel at something that isn’t the norm. Take your time and cultivate this hobby because it will bring great things in the future. When you’re a creative, you always have something to look forward to, a lifeline to hold onto when nothing else makes sense.  

 

Article by Queen of thick thighs (Damilola Toriola) 

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Roses On Roses

The upscale brand that gaps the bridge between streetwear and lifestyle apparel

Meet Adhiraj the mind behind the up growing brand from Saratoga, California, who started his brand from his home garage.
Tell us about yourself and who you are
I’m Adhiraj, the founder of Roses On Roses. I’m from Saratoga, where the brand was founded and where all manufacturing operations were initially run. I currently study Computer Engineering at UC Santa Cruz. When I’m not designing apparel or strategizing the next moves for the brand, I honestly don’t know what I’m doing other than schoolwork. I was never too fond of passing time watching TV or playing games other than Doodle Jump if that even counts.
Tell us about your brand ( how did you get the idea ) I started the brand in my sophomore year of high school, after I found myself dissatisfied with the merchandise that popular retailers held. To me, the perfect shirt possesses a combination of comfortable fabrics, meaningful artwork, and durability. It was ridiculous how I would have to continuously buy new shirts for my wardrobe after they would get ruined after a few washes. My goal was to create a clothing brand with designs which resonated with me and with materials that could withstand the test of time.
When did you start excuting Though the website officially didn’t go live until January 17, 2017, since the summer of 2016 I had been playing with mockups of shirts to find the perfect material and overall product that consisted with my vision. A lot of Q3 and Q4 of 2016 was spent creating the website, creating the first line of pieces, shooting pictures with models, and spreading the word via my social media accounts.
What are the obstacles that faced your brand While building a brand, there is just so much to do that if one is not fully dedicated it is very easy to fall off. To list of a few: garnering attention, fulfilling all the orders manually, configuring the website and consistently updating it, thinking of and delivering the best possible marketing campaigns via emails and social media.
Do you see yourself as an artist
I see myself as an entrepreneur, visionary, and artist. I think being an artist is so much more than simply being able to draw. I feel it’s more the ability to conceptualize and then create things that elicit an emotional response from oneself, and then others. I imagine the true artist to be one that can transpose what is experienced within the fabric of one’s creative source and craft it into something that can be expressed to share in a tangible form—clothing in this case.
Who does your designs I design my pieces and I wouldn’t have it any other way. Every design you see on the shirts is directly inspired by things that happened in my life, each portraying a different concept. Over time, the brand has come to serve as an outlet for my thoughts and emotions with each shirt essentially being a blank canvas for my mind to paint.
What are your dreams for your brand
I want to expand from just being an online retailer to a brick & mortar store which I would be able to design and build to my liking. In addition, I would love to host a fashion show one year for the launch of a new line.
Why the name roses on roses There’s really no elaborate backstory to how I came up with the name. I suppose it just came naturally to me. In my backyard at home we have a rose bush and it is really pretty, with roses on roses stacked endlessly on top of each other.